Tuesday, August 9, 2016

A Flower Garden in a PBK Bento Box

We're working on a new project this week, with Minted and Pottery Barn Kids, so the girl decided to try out our newest box for a kid-made bento.  We have lots of cool tools and she's fairly adept at using them and creating a balanced lunch, so my deal was I get to take pictures.

We're using a Pottery Barn Kids Spencer bento box for this lunch.  It's a good size, with 5 compartments (the largest equalling two of the smaller ones).  One of the smaller ones has a snap down lid, but we have not tried it with things like yogurt.  I think it might be great for something like strawberries that can get a little juicy and need to be separated.

In the larger lower compartment, she made herself a flower shaped ham and cheese sandwich with an extra cheese center, then placed it on top some pretzel Goldfish as her main dish.  We save the bread crusts to make egg in a hole for breakfast, so no waste.  To the left, she added some thick cucumber rounds, placed in a pink flower silicone cup and accented with a daisy pick.

The top row container small cookies in another pink flower cup in the snap down area in the hopes that it keeps the food from getting soft.  The middle compartment holds a sliced boiled egg in another silicone flower cup with another daisy pick.  The final container has a peeled mini clementine in yet another silicone cup alone with two other flower picks.

Since we are working on a specific project, we downloaded cute printable lunch notes from Minted and I wrote one for her.  The globe label with our last name is also one of the name labels I ordered from Minted.  I usually do last name labels only on shared gear (like this lunchbox) so there's less mine and yours going on.  The things we do when there's more than one kid!

Disclosure: I was sent Minted and Pottery Barn Kid products for the purpose of this post.  All opinions are my own.


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